Charles I to 1640, the Second Midterm

In preparation for next week's midterm, be sure to read Kishlansky's Chapter 5 (Reign of Charles '29-37) and Chapter 6 to page 144 (Rebellion and War '37-44); this really isn't much reading at all, something like 30 pages or so. Also, as ever, be sure to review the web outlines for lectures on Charles I and the crisis of '25-9 ( http://history.wisc.edu/sommerville/361/361-24.htm ) and the Personal Rule ( http://history.wisc.edu/sommerville/361/361-25.htm ). There is no additional primary reading this week, as I'd like you to focus on reviewing for the midterm.

 

As you're reading and reviewing this material, situate these events in the longer context of mounting antagonism and discord between the Crown and Commons (Center and Periphery; Establishment and People; Catholics and Puritans; etc. and etc.). When studying for the midterm, prepare for your multiple choice questions by thoroughly reviewing all your notes and readings from lectures and discussion; for the essays, try to think in both the long and short term. So, if you were to get a question on early Caroline finance, for example, not only would you naturally write about Charles, war, and taxation, but you could also further contextualize your answer by addressing the Jacobean (indeed the Elizabethan) inheritance of war, sale of lands, and debt. As we've done so many times in discussion section, try to recognize the microcosm of significant historical moments, and then blow that up into the macrocosm of the wider historical narrative.